Best Small Cars With A Big Boot

With the focus of car makers turning to small-capacity turbocharged petrols in their smaller models, Peugeot still offers a diesel unit in its 208 supermini. Here the 1.5-litre unit offers more than 73mpg and, with its bold design and modern technology, provides a decent drive and alternative to the Ford Fiesta.

The Peugeot 208 is an ultra-stylish alternative to the Ford Fiesta and Volkswagen Polo, with a bold design and modern technology. It also offers good performance and makes a practical option for city driving with its compact dimensions. The 1.5-litre diesel version can return more than 73mpg, too

One of the best superminis, the Peugeot 208 looks good, is practical and comes loaded with technology. The 1.5-litre diesel engine isn’t the punchiest, but it offers more than 73mpg.

Peugeot’s new 208 is already proving a hit with buyers in the UK, thanks to its modern design and small price tag. This diesel model offers good economy and low road tax as well as decent refinement. The 208 – which is based on the same architecture as the aforementioned Stellantis rivals – gained top marks for its performance in our latest reliability survey!

Best Small Cars With A Big Boot

We’ve chosen a selection of practical small cars with big boots, to help you decide which small car would suit your lifestyle. We’ve listed both the new and used price ranges for each car. 

1. Skoda Fabia

Skoda’s third generation Fabia impressed us by combining sharp looks with an incredibly spacious five-door body. It might lack the cuteness of some small hatches but you can enliven its appearance with a contrasting colour for the roof, mirror caps and wheels.

It tops our chart thanks to 330 litres of boot space with the rear seats in place, which can extend to an impressive 1,150 litres when they’re folded over.

There’s a range of efficient petrol and diesel engines across the Fabia range but for us the sweet spot is the 89bhp turbocharged 1.2 TSI, with a claimed average fuel consumption of 60mpg to keep running costs low. Choosing SE specification over the entry-level S bags you emergency city braking, air-con, an upgraded sound system with MirrorLink syncing for Android phones and 15-inch alloy wheels.

New price: £12,260 – £18,835
Lease this car from new
Used price: £4,385 – £14,625
Typical used monthly cost: £108 – £361
Pick of the range: Fabia 1.2 TSI 90PS SE
Fuel economy: 58 – 78 mpg
Boot space: 330 litres seats up, 1,150 litres seats folded

Read our full Skoda Fabia review

2. Dacia Sandero

Not only is the Dacia Sandero one of the roomiest small cars you can buy, it’s also the cheapest, but be aware that the bargain price means a no-frills package. That’s why we’d opt for the mid-spec Ambiance model paired with the tiny turbocharged 0.9-litre petrol engine, offering a claimed 56mpg.

Ambiance trim is hardly generous but it does ensure you’ve got electric front windows (air-con only comes with the range-topping Laureate trim), a CD player with Bluetooth connectivity and USB socket, remote central locking and trims for the otherwise bare steel wheels.

There are numerous cubbies dotted about the interior but the Sandero’s trump card, aside from its price, is the space on offer. Seats up the boot’s just 10 litres shy of the Fabia but when they’re folded the 1,200 litres of capacity available is the most of any small hatchback.

New price: £6,995 – £11,400
Lease this car from new
Used price: £2,005 – £8,790
Typical used monthly cost: £49 – £217
Pick of the range: Sandero 0.9 TCe 90 Ambiance
Fuel economy: 48 – 80 mpg
Boot space: 320 litres seats up, 1,200 litres seats folded

Read our full Dacia Sandero review

3. Renault Clio

Not giving much away to the Skoda and cheaper Dacia, the Renault Clio’s spacious five-door body still has a generous 300 litres of boot volume available with all the seats in place.

The swoopy Clio’s styling is also in contrast to the straight-laced looks of the Fabia and Sandero too, offering a genuine dash of French flair, as well as being flexible and practical, with a number of sensibly shaped cubbies around the cabin.

We’d choose the 0.9-litre turbo petrol engine – it’s an updated version of the Renault engine in the Dacia – offering up to a claimed 62mpg in this Clio.

Dynamique MediaNav is our specification of choice in the Clio range offering a seven-inch touchscreen with sat-nav, Bluetooth connectivity and USB connection, 16-inch alloy wheels and automatic lights and wipers.

New price: £13,620 – £19,170
Lease this car from new
Used price: £3,435 – £18,260
Typical used monthly cost: £85 – £450
Pick of the range: Clio 0.9 Energy TCe 90 Dynamique MediaNav
Fuel economy: 47 – 88 mpg
Boot space: 300 litres seats up, 1,146 litres seats folded

Read our full Renault Clio review

4. Hyundai i20 (15 on)

The latest Hyundai i20 offers not only much more interior space than the model it replaces, but also popular rivals like the Fiesta, Corsa and Polo.

While its seats-up boot space is the lowest of our list at some 35 litres less than the Fabia, the Hyundai’s rear seats do fold flat allowing you to maximise the cargo space available. Door bins in the front will hold 1.5-litre bottles, while those in the rear can take bottles of up to a litre in capacity.

We’ve opted for the naturally-aspirated 1.4-litre petrol engine here, offering a claimed 51mpg and paired it with SE trim which sits roughly in the middle of the i20 line-up. As part of the SE package you’ll benefit from 16-inch alloy wheels, front fog lights, Bluetooth connectivity, 1GB of music storage, cruise control and a lane departure warning system.

New price: £14,000 – £18,650
Lease this car from new
Used price: £4,605 – £14,270
Typical used monthly cost: £114 – £352
Pick of the range: i20 1.4 SE
Fuel economy: 44 – 88 mpg
Boot space: 295 litres seats up, 1,060 litres seats folded

Read our full Hyundai i20 review

5. Citroen C3 (2010-2016)

Although it’s the oldest car in this list (and there is a newer version now on sale), the Citroen C3 (2010-2016) gives little away in terms of spaciousness, offering virtually the same amount of boot space as the Clio, seats up or down.

While it’s spacious and has a number of slots and cubbies and seat-back pockets dotted about the interior to hide bits and bobs in, the door bins have very shallow sides limiting their practicality.

We’ve chosen VTR+ trim as the one to go for. While it comes with niceties such as chrome exterior touches, 15-inch alloy wheels, cruise control and air-con, the C3’s signature ‘Zenith’ windscreen, which stretches back over the front occupants’ heads, is optional.

Power-wise we’d go for Citroen’s three-cylinder 1.2 PureTech petrol engine, which produces a modest 81bhp, although economy benefits with a claimed 61mpg.

Used price: £1,415 – £9,115
Pick of the range: C3 1.2 PureTech 82 VTR+
Fuel economy: 42 – 83 mpg
Boot space: 300 litres seats up, 1,121 litres seats folded

The Peugeot 208 is a sporty supermini that can top 74mpg, only rivals can better this. The Ford Fiesta, Skoda Fabia and MINI Cooper are all more fun to drive, but the 208 has a realistic running cost advantage thanks to frugal engines and spacious cabin.

Peugeot’s nippy supermini is just one of many cars in the small hatchback class to make petrol engines the default choice – less than a third of all 208 owners opt for diesel. But as proved by Toyota with its new Yaris, hybrid power can make more of a difference when it comes to fuel economy.

Best Small Cars with a Big Boot

If you’re in the market for a small car with a huge boot, you needn’t look any further than the Honda Jazz. The latest model is a hybrid but don’t fear – its development team were given strict instructions that the petrol-electric drivetrain simply couldn’t affect the incredible practicality that the compact hatchback has become renowned for.

As such, the Honda Jazz can carry 304 litres of luggage. That’s not hugely impressive, but its clever ‘magic seat’ system allows you to flip and fold the rear bench to prioritise van-like practicality when required. It’ll swallow everything from a mountain bike to garden plants. 

The aforementioned hybrid setup means it’ll be very cheap to run, officially capable of more than 60mpg. All Jazz models are well equipped and, if you want a more rugged version, there’s the SUV-like Crosstar model.

Cars with big boot space

1. Kia Picanto

Used deals from £7,999
Monthly finance from £140*

It might be small, but the Kia Picanto city car isn’t lacking in boot space. Indeed, its 255-litre boot is large enough to rival some larger superminis, so you don’t have to hold back when you’re in town getting some retail therapy. It’s certainly large enough for two big shopping bags or a chunky suitcase.

In all versions of the Picanto, the back seats split and fold 60/40 to increase the load area to 1,010 litres. You may want to avoid the entry-level Picanto 1, as this lacks a seatback pocket on the front passenger seat and a centre console with storage box and sliding armrest. The Picanto 2 gets the seatback pocket, but you’ll need to upgrade to the Picanto 3 or above for the pair.

The Kia Picanto comes with a seven-year warranty, which should provide great peace of mind when buying a used example, with even four-year-old versions offering the same amount of manufacturer warranty as most brand new cars.

KIA PICANTO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Kia Picanto deals

2. Hyundai i10

Used deals from £11,995
Monthly finance from £195*

Although the Hyundai i10 shares the platform it’s built around with the Kia Picanto, the boot is slightly smaller at 252 litres. In reality, you’re not going to notice the difference – this remains a large boot for the size of the car. Folding the back seats increases the luggage capacity to 1,050 litres – more than the Picanto can offer.

Like the Picanto, there’s a high loading lip, but this is to be expected in a city car. There’s no underfloor storage either, so it’s a case of what you see is what you get. For the dimensions of the car, though, the boot is pretty large.

The current Hyundai i10 (pictured above), introduced in 2020, is the best yet, with smart styling, a noticeable increase in quality and an excellent level of standard equipment. The Premium trim packs the kind of equipment you’d associate with a significantly more expensive car, too.

2020-PRESENT HYUNDAI I10 BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Hyundai i10 deals

3. Suzuki Celerio

Used deals from £5,458
Monthly finance from £101*

The Suzuki Celerio is one of the most affordable cars on BuyaCar. It was discontinued in 2019, but the Celerio should be a dependable choice.

It’s also incredibly spacious, with enough room for five adults in the cabin and a 254-litre boot in the back. The rear seats split 60:40 to provide more luggage space, although the 726-litre total puts the Celerio behind many of its rivals on overall load space. You’ll just have to make two trips to the shops if you go on a shopping binge.

Low running costs are almost guaranteed thanks to frugal and punchy 1.0-litre petrol engines, as is cheap insurance. Right now, it’s impossible to get a more spacious car of this age for such a low monthly payment.

SUZUKI CELERIO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Suzuki Celerio deals

4. Skoda Citigo

Used deals from £4,795
Monthly finance from £95*

The Skoda Citigo, Seat Mii and Volkswagen Up are near-identical cars separated by different badges, trim levels and features. There are two good reasons why you might choose the Citigo over its closely-related siblings: price and availability. It’s more affordable than the Volkswagen version and more widely available than the Seat.

For such a small car, the Skoda Citigo is remarkably well packaged. There are three- and five-door versions available, although the latter makes more sense if practicality is your top priority. The boot offers 250 litres of luggage capacity with the seats up, or 959 litres with the seats folded down.

It’s worth finding a Citigo with the optional variable boot floor, as this allows you to create a totally flat floor.

SKODA CITIGO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Skoda Citigo deals

5. Renault Clio

Used deals from £9,828
Monthly finance from £186*

You’d expect a supermini to offer more boot space than a smaller city car. The new Renault Clio goes one better by offering enough luggage capacity to rival a larger family hatchback. The penalty for the large boot is slightly cramped rear-seat accommodation, but the Clio is more than acceptable in this regard.

The amount of boot space you get depends on the engine and gearbox combination. Petrol versions offer the most, with a substantial 391 litres of space. That’s 40 litres more than a Volkswagen Polo and 10 litres more than the bigger Volkswagen Golf.

Luggage capacity drops to 366 litres in diesel versions and 301 litres in the E-Tech hybrid. In all cases, the rear seats fold 60:40 if you need to carry larger loads. This version of the Clio went on sale in 2019, so prices are still dropping.

RENAULT CLIO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Renault Clio deals

6. Nissan Note

Used deals from £7,495
Monthly finance from £146*

Although the Nissan Note was discontinued in 2017, there are still plenty of used examples to choose from. If you’re after a big boot, this compact Nissan certainly reaches the right notes, thanks to an impressive 381 litres of luggage capacity.

Most versions feature a removable boot floor, which is handy if you need to carry taller loads. With this in place, you get a flush floor and a place to store your valuables underneath. You can even slide the rear seats forward to create more space.

Here’s the best bit: with the rear seats folded down, the Note offers 1,465 litres of capacity. That’s the kind of figure you’d associate with a much larger estate car or people carrier.

NISSAN NOTE BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Nissan Note deals

7. Honda Jazz

Used deals from £8,990
Monthly finance from £156*

The Honda Jazz has developed a reputation for offering best-in-class levels of interior space. The version built from 2015 until 2020 is a good case in point, thanks to its 354-litre boot. This means it offers the benefits of a compact city car in its ease of driving, with the boot space of a much bigger machine.

It gets better, because its ‘Magic Seats’ setup mean that the rear seats can be folded down to create a 1,314-litre boot or flipped up to turn the footwells into extra storage compartments. None of this comes at the expense of headroom or legroom.

Although the Jazz is a little more expensive than some of its mainstream rivals, the additional cost should be offset by the car’s excellent reliability. Fewer visits to the garage means more money in your pocket.

HONDA JAZZ BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Honda Jazz deals

8. Seat Ibiza

Used deals from £9,900
Monthly finance from £166*

The Seat Ibiza is one of the most stylish superminis you can get. It also offers exceptional value for money, with even luxurious Xcellence Lux versions costing around £20,500 when new – not bad for such a well-equipped car. Low prices on the used market make it even more appealing.

Standard equipment is excellent, although upgrading to FR trim adds cosmetic upgrades that give the Ibiza a sportier look. Not that any of this comes at the expense of practicality, with its 355-litre boot being more than adequate for this size of car.

The back seats fold 60:40, but it’s worth finding a used Ibiza with the optional Storage Pack. This adds space under the boot floor, a cargo net and a storage drawer under the front seats for extra practicality.

SEAT IBIZA BUYERS’ GUIDE

As well as being incredibly practical for their compact dimensions, they’re all cheap to buy and affordable to run. Read on to find the most capacious little hatchbacks, as picked by heycar’s team of automotive experts.

Best Small Cars With Large Boots

Honda Jazz

Year launched: 2020

If you’re in the market for a small car with a huge boot, you needn’t look any further than the Honda Jazz. The latest model is a hybrid but don’t fear – its development team were given strict instructions that the petrol-electric drivetrain simply couldn’t affect the incredible practicality that the compact hatchback has become renowned for.

As such, the Honda Jazz can carry 304 litres of luggage. That’s not hugely impressive, but its clever ‘magic seat’ system allows you to flip and fold the rear bench to prioritise van-like practicality when required. It’ll swallow everything from a mountain bike to garden plants. 

The aforementioned hybrid setup means it’ll be very cheap to run, officially capable of more than 60mpg. All Jazz models are well equipped and, if you want a more rugged version, there’s the SUV-like Crosstar model…

Find a Honda Jazz for saleRead our full Honda Jazz Review

Nissan Note

Year launched: 2016

The Nissan Note is a cheap and practical small car. Prices start at under £4000 and all models provide a maximum of 411 litres of boot space. 

The rear seats in the Note are fully adjustable, which means you can slide them back to maximise passenger space or push them forwards to prioritise storage. But even with the rear seats pushed right back, you still get 325 litres of boot space – which is better than the Ford Fiesta and Dacia Sandero Stepway.

The Note isn’t available as a new car anymore in the UK – Nissan stopped selling it in 2016 – but there are lots of deals on the used market. Both the 1.5-litre diesel and 1.2-litre petrol are efficient and smooth engines, with the former advertised with 80+mpg. 

Find a Nissan Note for saleRead our full Nissan Note Review

SEAT Ibiza

Year launched: 2017

Comfortable, practical and cheap to run, the SEAT Ibiza is one of the most rounded small cars you can buy. Despite its compact size, the Ibiza punches above its weight when it comes to space, which makes it a very usable and likeable compact hatchback. 

The Ibiza’s boot has 355-litres of boot space, which makes it extremely versatile. The seat seats can be folded and split, which means you can utilise the full load length of the car and still carry one or two passengers in the back. With both rear seats down the Ibiza has up 823 litres – more than enough to lug around bulky bits of furniture. 

On the road, the Ibiza is comfortable and easy to drive. There is lots of passenger space and the wide windscreen provides perfect all-round visibility. What’s more, powered by SEAT’s excellent turbocharged 1.0-litre engine, the Ibiza will return 50+mpg. 

Find a SEAT Ibiza for saleRead our full SEAT Ibiza Review

Volkswagen Polo

Year launched: 2017

The latest Volkswagen Polo is a car that we rate very highly. In fact, we’re going to go out on a limb here and say it’s the best small hatchback on sale today. It also has a huge boot, which makes it one of the most practical. 

The Polo shares its mechanical platform and engines with the Ibiza, which means you get 355 litres of storage space with the rear seats in place. Like the SEAT Ibiza, this Volkswagen has a wide and deep boot space and this makes it very practical for the day-to-day. 

The Polo might share a lot of its oil bits with the Ibiza, but it isn’t a clone. Far from it, the Polo is more refined, quieter on the motorway and better styled. You also get a colourful interior that gives the cabin a funky lift over the dull and grey design found in the SEAT. 

Find a Volkswagen Polo for saleRead our full Volkswagen Polo Review

Dacia Sandero Stepway

Year launched: 2013

Cheap, easy to drive and wonderfully versatile, the Dacia Sandero Stepway is an easy car to recommend. Admittedly, the interior is a little cheap and cheerful, but if you want a practical and affordable small car then the Dacia is difficult to fault. 

The Sandero’s big boot is a big selling point. You’ll find 320 litres in the boot, and this can be extended to a whopping 1200 litres if you lower the rear bench. The interior might appear low rent, but the hard and scratchy plastics are tough and easy to clean. This means you can throw things in the back and feel confident that nothing will get damaged in the process. 

Behind the wheel, the Dacia is no match for its pricer rivals. The road handling will not win any Top Gear prizes, but it is comfortable and predictable to drive. There is a good choice of efficient engines, too, with petrol, diesel and LPG on offer. If you want a cheap and practical car, the Dacia will not disappoint. 

1. Kia Picanto

Used deals from £7,999
Monthly finance from £140*

It might be small, but the Kia Picanto city car isn’t lacking in boot space. Indeed, its 255-litre boot is large enough to rival some larger superminis, so you don’t have to hold back when you’re in town getting some retail therapy. It’s certainly large enough for two big shopping bags or a chunky suitcase.

In all versions of the Picanto, the back seats split and fold 60/40 to increase the load area to 1,010 litres. You may want to avoid the entry-level Picanto 1, as this lacks a seatback pocket on the front passenger seat and a centre console with storage box and sliding armrest. The Picanto 2 gets the seatback pocket, but you’ll need to upgrade to the Picanto 3 or above for the pair.

The Kia Picanto comes with a seven-year warranty, which should provide great peace of mind when buying a used example, with even four-year-old versions offering the same amount of manufacturer warranty as most brand new cars.

KIA PICANTO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Kia Picanto deals

2. Hyundai i10

Used deals from £11,995
Monthly finance from £195*

Although the Hyundai i10 shares the platform it’s built around with the Kia Picanto, the boot is slightly smaller at 252 litres. In reality, you’re not going to notice the difference – this remains a large boot for the size of the car. Folding the back seats increases the luggage capacity to 1,050 litres – more than the Picanto can offer.

Like the Picanto, there’s a high loading lip, but this is to be expected in a city car. There’s no underfloor storage either, so it’s a case of what you see is what you get. For the dimensions of the car, though, the boot is pretty large.

The current Hyundai i10 (pictured above), introduced in 2020, is the best yet, with smart styling, a noticeable increase in quality and an excellent level of standard equipment. The Premium trim packs the kind of equipment you’d associate with a significantly more expensive car, too.

2020-PRESENT HYUNDAI I10 BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Hyundai i10 deals

3. Suzuki Celerio

Used deals from £5,458
Monthly finance from £101*

The Suzuki Celerio is one of the most affordable cars on BuyaCar. It was discontinued in 2019, but the Celerio should be a dependable choice.

It’s also incredibly spacious, with enough room for five adults in the cabin and a 254-litre boot in the back. The rear seats split 60:40 to provide more luggage space, although the 726-litre total puts the Celerio behind many of its rivals on overall load space. You’ll just have to make two trips to the shops if you go on a shopping binge.

Low running costs are almost guaranteed thanks to frugal and punchy 1.0-litre petrol engines, as is cheap insurance. Right now, it’s impossible to get a more spacious car of this age for such a low monthly payment.

SUZUKI CELERIO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Suzuki Celerio deals

4. Skoda Citigo

Used deals from £4,795
Monthly finance from £95*

The Skoda Citigo, Seat Mii and Volkswagen Up are near-identical cars separated by different badges, trim levels and features. There are two good reasons why you might choose the Citigo over its closely-related siblings: price and availability. It’s more affordable than the Volkswagen version and more widely available than the Seat.

For such a small car, the Skoda Citigo is remarkably well packaged. There are three- and five-door versions available, although the latter makes more sense if practicality is your top priority. The boot offers 250 litres of luggage capacity with the seats up, or 959 litres with the seats folded down.

It’s worth finding a Citigo with the optional variable boot floor, as this allows you to create a totally flat floor.

SKODA CITIGO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Skoda Citigo deals

5. Renault Clio

Used deals from £10,007
Monthly finance from £189*

You’d expect a supermini to offer more boot space than a smaller city car. The new Renault Clio goes one better by offering enough luggage capacity to rival a larger family hatchback. The penalty for the large boot is slightly cramped rear-seat accommodation, but the Clio is more than acceptable in this regard.

The amount of boot space you get depends on the engine and gearbox combination. Petrol versions offer the most, with a substantial 391 litres of space. That’s 40 litres more than a Volkswagen Polo and 10 litres more than the bigger Volkswagen Golf.

Luggage capacity drops to 366 litres in diesel versions and 301 litres in the E-Tech hybrid. In all cases, the rear seats fold 60:40 if you need to carry larger loads. This version of the Clio went on sale in 2019, so prices are still dropping.

RENAULT CLIO BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Renault Clio deals

6. Nissan Note

Used deals from £7,495
Monthly finance from £146*

Although the Nissan Note was discontinued in 2017, there are still plenty of used examples to choose from. If you’re after a big boot, this compact Nissan certainly reaches the right notes, thanks to an impressive 381 litres of luggage capacity.

Most versions feature a removable boot floor, which is handy if you need to carry taller loads. With this in place, you get a flush floor and a place to store your valuables underneath. You can even slide the rear seats forward to create more space.

Here’s the best bit: with the rear seats folded down, the Note offers 1,465 litres of capacity. That’s the kind of figure you’d associate with a much larger estate car or people carrier.

NISSAN NOTE BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Nissan Note deals

7. Honda Jazz

Used deals from £8,990
Monthly finance from £156*

The Honda Jazz has developed a reputation for offering best-in-class levels of interior space. The version built from 2015 until 2020 is a good case in point, thanks to its 354-litre boot. This means it offers the benefits of a compact city car in its ease of driving, with the boot space of a much bigger machine.

It gets better, because its ‘Magic Seats’ setup mean that the rear seats can be folded down to create a 1,314-litre boot or flipped up to turn the footwells into extra storage compartments. None of this comes at the expense of headroom or legroom.

Although the Jazz is a little more expensive than some of its mainstream rivals, the additional cost should be offset by the car’s excellent reliability. Fewer visits to the garage means more money in your pocket.

HONDA JAZZ BUYERS’ GUIDEUsed Honda Jazz deals

8. Seat Ibiza

Used deals from £9,900
Monthly finance from £166*

The Seat Ibiza is one of the most stylish superminis you can get. It also offers exceptional value for money, with even luxurious Xcellence Lux versions costing around £20,500 when new – not bad for such a well-equipped car. Low prices on the used market make it even more appealing.

Standard equipment is excellent, although upgrading to FR trim adds cosmetic upgrades that give the Ibiza a sportier look. Not that any of this comes at the expense of practicality, with its 355-litre boot being more than adequate for this size of car.

The back seats fold 60:40, but it’s worth finding a used Ibiza with the optional Storage Pack. This adds space under the boot floor, a cargo net and a storage drawer under the front seats for extra practicality.

The aforementioned hybrid setup means it’ll be very cheap to run, officially capable of more than 60mpg. All Jazz models are well equipped and, if you want a more rugged version, there’s the SUV-like Crosstar model…

Find a Honda Jazz for saleRead our full Honda Jazz Review

Nissan Note

Year launched: 2016

06/10

The Nissan Note is a cheap and practical small car. Prices start at under £4000 and all models provide a maximum of 411 litres of boot space. 

The rear seats in the Note are fully adjustable, which means you can slide them back to maximise passenger space or push them forwards to prioritise storage. But even with the rear seats pushed right back, you still get 325 litres of boot space – which is better than the Ford Fiesta and Dacia Sandero Stepway.

The Note isn’t available as a new car anymore in the UK – Nissan stopped selling it in 2016 – but there are lots of deals on the used market. Both the 1.5-litre diesel and 1.2-litre petrol are efficient and smooth engines, with the former advertised with 80+mpg. 

Small car with big boot for pram

Find a Nissan Note for saleRead our full Nissan Note Review

SEAT Ibiza

Year launched: 2017

Comfortable, practical and cheap to run, the SEAT Ibiza is one of the most rounded small cars you can buy. Despite its compact size, the Ibiza punches above its weight when it comes to space, which makes it a very usable and likeable compact hatchback. 

The Ibiza’s boot has 355-litres of boot space, which makes it extremely versatile. The seat seats can be folded and split, which means you can utilise the full load length of the car and still carry one or two passengers in the back. With both rear seats down the Ibiza has up 823 litres – more than enough to lug around bulky bits of furniture. 

On the road, the Ibiza is comfortable and easy to drive. There is lots of passenger space and the wide windscreen provides perfect all-round visibility. What’s more, powered by SEAT’s excellent turbocharged 1.0-litre engine, the Ibiza will return 50+mpg. 

Find a SEAT Ibiza for saleRead our full SEAT Ibiza Review

Volkswagen Polo

Year launched: 2017

The latest Volkswagen Polo is a car that we rate very highly. In fact, we’re going to go out on a limb here and say it’s the best small hatchback on sale today. It also has a huge boot, which makes it one of the most practical. 

The Polo shares its mechanical platform and engines with the Ibiza, which means you get 355 litres of storage space with the rear seats in place. Like the SEAT Ibiza, this Volkswagen has a wide and deep boot space and this makes it very practical for the day-to-day. 

The Polo might share a lot of its oil bits with the Ibiza, but it isn’t a clone. Far from it, the Polo is more refined, quieter on the motorway and better styled. You also get a colourful interior that gives the cabin a funky lift over the dull and grey design found in the SEAT. 

Find a Volkswagen Polo for saleRead our full Volkswagen Polo Review

Dacia Sandero Stepway

Year launched: 2013

Cheap, easy to drive and wonderfully versatile, the Dacia Sandero Stepway is an easy car to recommend. Admittedly, the interior is a little cheap and cheerful, but if you want a practical and affordable small car then the Dacia is difficult to fault. 

The Sandero’s big boot is a big selling point. You’ll find 320 litres in the boot, and this can be extended to a whopping 1200 litres if you lower the rear bench. The interior might appear low rent, but the hard and scratchy plastics are tough and easy to clean. This means you can throw things in the back and feel confident that nothing will get damaged in the process. 

best small cars with a big boot

Peugeot has been able to squeeze more economy out of its 1.5-litre diesel engine by fitting it with a 12-volt mild hybrid system. With less than 100g/km emissions, the French supermini also has low taxes and cheap servicing. The engine is mated to a manual gearbox as standard, but there’s an optional automatic that can only be used in tandem with the mild hybrid system that allows coasting at speeds as high as 70mph. It’s also available in five-door bodystyles only, but Peugeot offer lots of fancy options such as leather trim and driver aids.

Peugeot’s 208 is the French alternative to cars like the Ford Fiesta, Volkswagen Polo and Vauxhall Corsa. Its cabin feels more upmarket than its rivals, with bold styling and excellent quality on show. It’s marginally cheaper than some of its competitors, but undercuts the supermini class leaders such as the Ford Fiesta and Honda Jazz for running costs.

Top 10 Small Family Cars with the Biggest Boot Space Australia

MANUFACTURERS

Jan 25th, 2022

Shopping for a family vehicle isn’t all about comparing safety features and number of seats. Another factor that you must look into is the boot capacity. 

In reality, however, no one really looks into the rear compartment during the shopping stage. The smallness of a boot only hits you when you realize there’s not enough room for your shopping bags, much less for everyone’s luggage when you’re on a long trip. 

The best small family cars with biggest boot space come from the likes of Kia, Hyundai, Suzuki, Nissan, and Honda. Volkswagen, Peugeot, and Skoda also have family car models with impressive boot capacities. 

In most cases, these vehicles allow for back seats that can split and fold to expand the boot space even further to fit more items.

In this article, we’ll dive right into the top 10 small family cars with the biggest boot space to help you in your search for the ideal family car.

While we’re at it, we’ll also explore the differences between the car boot and car trunk, and have some fun poking at a new word coined for the luggage compartment.

Let’s get started.

Which Small Family Cars Have the Biggest Boot Space?

Suppose you’re in the market for a family car with plenty of boot space, then the first thing you must know is that boot capacity is typically measured in litres and sometimes cubic centimetres. 

It will also be handy to remember this:

1 litre is equal to 1 cubic decimetre or 1000 cubic centimetre

or 1 L = 1 dm= 1000 cc

Knowing this will make it easy for you to compare boot spaces between car brands and models and choose the best for you and your family.

To help you with your search, we’ve shortlisted ten makes and models.

Top 10 Small Family Cars with the Biggest Boot Space in Australia

1. Kia Picanto

The first car on our list is the Kia Picanto. Despite the car’s size, it boasts an impressive 255-litre boot in the back. 

Much like the other cars on this list, you’ll see that the Kia Picanto has an option to split and fold the backseat to increase the boot space. Of course, this would only be possible if you didn’t have anyone occupying the rear seats. 

In the case of the Picanto, you can split and fold the rear seats 60:40 to increase boot space to 1,010 litres.

2. Hyundai i10

Korean carmaker Hyundai has a spot on this list with the Hyundai i10. The car has many high-tech features, but what we’re interested in is the boot space. This car has a 252-litre boot, slightly smaller compared to the previous model. In addition, the back seats can fold to increase that space to 1,050 litres.

3. Suzuki Celerio

Suzuki’s Celerio comes with a 254-litre boot. Like the Kia Picanto earlier, the back seats can be split and folded 60:40, bringing boot space up to 726 litres for more cargo space.

4. Nissan Note

Nissan discontinued the Nissan Note back in 2017, but it’s still an excellent family vehicle that you can find on the used car market. The standard boot space on this car is 381 litres, beating all the three models mentioned above.

That space is even more impressive with the rear seat folded, increasing it up to a whopping 1,465 litres.

5. Honda Jazz

Everybody knows and loves the Honda Jazz for a handful of different reasons. Here’s one more reason to add to that list – it has a standard boot space of 354 litres. 

Honda has its Magic Seat feature, which allows for several different rear-seat configurations beyond the typical 60:40 split. With Magic Seat, you can enjoy Honda Jazz’s maximum boot space of 1,314 litres.

6. Volkswagen Golf

Another familiar name is the Volkswagen Golf. The standard boot space on this car is 380 litres, though the estate version offers plenty more at 605 litres of space for car boot tool storage or anything else.

7. Renault Megane

Renault Megane, designed for families in mind, comes with an above-average 434 litres of boot space. This car is well-known for the boot’s square design, making it easier to organise your cargo, with or without a car boot organiser. 

8. Honda Civic

As we go down this list, you may have noticed that the standard boot spaces keep getting bigger, but that’s primarily because our list started with micro and supermini cars (e.g. Picanto, Jazz) and slowly moved to small cars (e.g. Megane, Golf). Another step up from the previous model is the Honda Civic with its 492-litre boot, expandable up to 1,210 litres by folding the rear seats.

9. Peugeot 308

French automaker Peugeot’s 308 boasts of a 501-litre boot, the second-largest boot capacity on this list. It will accommodate your luggage to take the family on road trips with this car. Or, if the rear seats are empty, you can fold them to enjoy 1,309 litres of trunk space instead. 

10. Skoda Octavia

Last but certainly not least, if you’re looking for the most boot space possible in a small family car, you’ll want the Skoda Octavia. The standard boot space is a mind-blowing 590 litres, and more so at 1,580 litres with the back seat folded. 

So now, on to our trivia!

Car Boot or Trunk: What’s the Difference?

The terms car boot and car trunk refer to the same thing, and many people use these terms interchangeably. Boot and trunk are names for a vehicle’s rear storage area for anything from bags to boxes. 

The boot or trunk is only accessible from the outside of the vehicle, so you’ll need to stop and walk over to it. So for practicality, you should only use it for keeping items that you don’t need while the car is mobile. 

If Boot and Trunk are the Same Thing, What’s the Difference?

There’s no difference, it’s just that boot and trunk are among those words that are caught in the great American English vs British English divide, so to speak. Americans use ‘trunk’ while British, Australians, and most everyone else use boot. 

What’s interesting, though, is the history of how the terms came about, which emphasizes the difference between the two cultures. 

In the early days of the American automobile, they literally mounted a trunk on a car’s rear to serve as storage for items. The name stuck, so until now, that’s what Americans call that space in the modern car.

At about the same period, the British used a boot locker on the back of their carriages and early automobiles. The locker contained boots that the driver would put on to get in the mud and perform simple repairs on the vehicle. ‘Boot locker’ was eventually shortened to ‘boot’, which found its way to wherever the Queen’s English was spoken and up to this day.

With such charming histories for both words, why would you even imagine changing the terms now? Trunk or boot, they both deserve such enduring, endearing names. 

So, who is this third guy Frunk?  

What Is a Frunk?

Another variation that we should all be aware of is the ‘frunk’. No, he’s not the new boss in town – that would be Franky. Rather, it’s short for ‘front trunk’. 

Frunks have been around for decades. The first one must have been used on the VW Beetle in the 1930s, although I’m sure it wasn’t called ‘frunk’ back then. Considering that storage compartments in European cars were more likely called boot, the Beetle most probably had a ‘froot’ (front boot).   

Seriously, though, frunks were always a common feature in vehicles with a rear-placed engine, where the only storage space available was at the front. And don’t brush the term aside just yet because you’ll hear more and more of it in the future.

Why?

The term ‘frunk’ will become increasingly popular for yet another reason – electric cars. Simply put, EVs don’t have a large engine to occupy what would traditionally be the engine bay on ICE-vehicles. Still, that extra space must remain a part of the vehicle’s design to serve as a crumple zone (the part that absorbs impact in a collision).

So, without the typical engine to occupy the space, there’s plenty of room for storage at the front, and that’s the frunk

Hope you learned something useful and fun today about the three musketeers – boot, trunk, and frunk.

With its sporty looks, excellent economy and low emissions, the new Peugeot 208 is everything that a supermini should be.

2021 Peugeot 208 1.5 BlueHDI Allure As a result of an innovative design, the new PEUGEOT e-208 benefits from a set-up with battery and chassis under the floor without affecting its attractive exterior styling, passenger space or boot capacity.

Looking for a car that can offer decent fuel economy? We’ve listed the most fuel efficient cars in our comprehensive guide, that covers petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric models.

This list contains the most fuel-efficient cars available in the UK, according to new WLTP Official Fuel Consumption figures. The figures show how far you can travel on a gallon of fuel and provide motorists with reliable comparative data that shows where they can make savings. Cars are listed in order of their miles per gallon, from highest to lowest mpg.

Best Small Cars With A Big Boot

If you’re in the market for a small car with a huge boot, you needn’t look any further than the Honda Jazz. The latest model is a hybrid but don’t fear – its development team were given strict instructions that the petrol-electric drivetrain simply couldn’t affect the incredible practicality that the compact hatchback has become renowned for.

If you’re in the market for a small car with a huge boot, you needn’t look any further than the Honda Jazz. The latest model is a hybrid but don’t fear – its development team were given strict instructions that the petrol-electric drivetrain simply couldn’t affect the incredible practicality that the compact hatchback has become renowned for.

If you’re in the market for a small car with a huge boot, you needn’t look any further than the Honda Jazz. Its development team were given strict instructions that the petrol-electric drivetrain simply couldn’t affect the incredible practicality that the compact hatchback has become renowned for.

The Honda Jazz supermini has a genius ‘magic seat’ system that allows you to flip and fold the rear bench to prioritise van-like practicality when required.

The Jazz Hybrid offers a 304-litre boot with Magic Seats that can flip and fold to allow the car to ferry everything from mountain bikes to garden plants.

The Honda Jazz is one of the most practical small cars you can buy thanks to its clever space-saving technology that’s often overlooked. Strictly speaking, the boot isn’t very big unless you’re using it for personal use with a few shopping bags and suitcases, but if you really need to carry something big then the Honda Jazz is your car. The ‘magic seat’ system allows the rear bench to be flipped and folded flat to create a cavernous load space at the rear.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.